How schools, trains and concerts are building up Miami’s neighborhoods

On Thursday, school’s out for summer at the Downtown Doral Charter Elementary, and its report card is packed with A’s. In only its second year of operation, the school is already topping county-wide honor rolls — and helping to fuel Doral’s thriving real estate market.

In the post-recession building boom, developers promoted sweeping waterfront views and luxury bonuses like car elevators, bowling alleys, plunge pools and private chefs to wealthy buyers. But in recent months, while sales in the luxury condo market have stalled amid a slowdown in Latin America, developers are starting to reap the benefits from master plans that incorporate long-term, community-building amenities.

The Downtown Doral Charter Elementary School is one gamble that has paid off. The Florida Department of Education ranked the school tops among Miami-Dade elementaries for total achievement in English and math in 2015- 2016. In November, principal Jeanette Acevedo-Isenberg won the Council for Educational Change’s annual Leonard Miller Principal Leadership Award —the first time a charter school won the honor.

The school is also proving to be a formidable draw for homebuyers. While any child who lives in Miami can apply to attend, residents of the new Downtown Doral development are given preference. According to a report by Gridics.com, Doral had 167 sale closings in the first quarter of 2017 — the fifth-highest of any neighborhood in Miami-Dade County.

Codina Partners CEO Ana Codina Barlick, who has overseen the metamorphosis of Downtown Doral from drab offices into a thriving work/live/play community, said an elementary school offering top-notch education was always a critical part of the master plan. A high school is scheduled to break ground in 2018.

“Our business is real estate, not education,” Codina said. “We don’t make a penny off the school. We just wanted it to be great, because the better it is, the more people would want to live in this community.”

In addition to that massive, 120-acre development, which cost more than $1 billion, Codina Partners also gave Doral a new city hall and the three-acre Downtown Doral park. But the elementary school takes developer-led community facilities to a new level.

“GENTRIFICATION IS THE GENESIS OF PEOPLE TRYING TO MAKE MONEY. NO ONE THINKS DEVELOPERS ARE DOING THESE THINGS OUT OF THE GOODNESS OF THEIR HEARTS.”

Doug Jones, managing partner of JAG Insurance Group

The Downtown Doral Charter Elementary School is the first charter school built in a public-private partnership between the Miami-Dade School Board and a developer. Codina Partners donated the $3.5 million plot of land where the school sits. The school is a 501 (c)(3) nonprofit corporation with its own board. That board leased the land back from the county school board and issued $20 million in bonds to construct the building.

The nonprofit board pays the Miami-Dade School Board a fee to manage the Doral operation. But the nonprofit board hires the principal and sets the direction of the school. Reflecting Doral’s high percentage of Hispanic residents, 60 percent of all classes are taught in English; the other 40 percent are in either Spanish or Portuguese. Teachers at the school work under one- year contracts.

“It wasn’t just about providing a school,” Codina said. “That’s really easy. You can call a charter school company and they will put a school here and you don’t have to think about it. We wanted to go beyond that.”

The investment is working. An analysis of U.S. census data by Florida International University’s Metropolitan Center reveals Doral is the fastest-growing big city in Florida and the 11th fastest in the U.S., with 58,000 residents in 2016 — a 26.1 percent increase since 2016. The median price of homes currently listed in Doral is $398,000; the median rent is $2,300. The median income of Doral households was $72,933 in 2015 — almost 60 percent higher than the Miami-Dade County median of $43,129.

“One of the big things that drives property values up is having good education nearby,” Codina said. “We wanted to sell something more than walls, a roof, a floor and some nice appliances. We offer a much bigger value to people by telling them if you move here, you have a school for your kids through high school.”

Quality-of- life perks

Doral isn’t alone in focusing on education: The Related Urban Development Group is currently negotiating with the Miami-Dade School Board to include a secondary school at its Gallery at West Brickell affordable and workforce housing project at 201 SW 10th St. Other developers are pinpointing facilities most important to their own potential buyers, including transit stations, places of worship, cultural events and infrastructure designed to serve full- time Miami residents and improve their quality of life.

“Real estate has started to transition away from just brick-and- mortar investment and more into creating a sense of place and being part of the fabric of their community,” said Steven Hurwitz, a partner at the Florida real estate firm CREC.

“It’s not a purely altruistic move, but developers who have done it successfully are seeing it equates to a more successful investment overall,” Hurwitz said. “Miami neighborhoods are starting to develop individual identities. The projects being presented in them are often playing a role in servicing that demographic and delivering more of an experience.”

Some of those projects are relatively small in scale and cater to a niche demographic. But their impact on their respective communities can be significant.

As part of its 17-floor, 61-unit luxury condo project Aurora, at 17550 Collins Ave., developer Verzasca Group is donating a 2,000 square-foot mikvah — a bath used by Jewish men and women for ritual immersion — to the Chabad

Lubavitch of Sunny Isles Beach. The mikvah, to be delivered upon completion of the building, will have a separate entrance and will be available for use by anyone in the community, not just residents of the tower.

“As a fairly new developer in town, we started to do community outreach and meet with the neighbors to understand who lives in the area,” said Verzasca managing director Tim Lobanov. “We knew we would need to get approval from the city commissioners for this project. We met with Rabbi Yisrael Baron of the community center across the street and he told us about the need. Among the Jewish people in the area, we are already known as the building that’s going to have a mikvah in it.”

On Miami’s Upper East Side, Global City Development and the Midtown Group are teaming up on a mixed-use development named Legions West that would initially bring 237 rental apartments and a new 15,000 square-foot American Legion facility overlooking Biscayne Bay at 6445 NE Seventh Ave. in Miami.

“We’re trying to update what the American Legion has been in the past — a place for older veterans to come have a drink and talk — and attract younger veterans from Afghanistan and Iraq who have young families and want to participate in activities that are more relevant for them,” said Brian Pearl, principal and co-founder of Global City Development. “We’ve organized our whole business around socially impactful real estate development. There’s a benefit to having more integrated communities that will pay off in the long run.”

Pearl said that even though his company won’t make any money from the American Legion facility, doing something positive for the community helps people feel more comfortable with new development.

Global’s desire to incorporate a swath of Legion Memorial Park into its eventual 1.2 million square-foot complex has already met with resistance. That kind of controversy is bound to arise when locals don’t entirely agree with the developer’s vision.

“Businessmen will always be businessmen,” said Doug Jones, managing partner of JAG Insurance Group. “Gentrification is the genesis of people trying to make money. No one thinks developers are doing these things out of the goodness of their hearts. But at the end of the day, you can’t stop a lot of this from happening, so it becomes about what you can get out of it. A lot of developers end up making positive changes in communities by doing what they have to do in order to get their deals done.”

Changing the city

Other developers are taking a big-picture approach with amenities needed to help Miami fulfill its destiny as a major metropolis — with all the accompanying infrastructure that implies. In traffic-challenged Miami-Dade, nearly a dozen mixed-use residential projects are planned along U.S. 1 and in Hialeah, close to Metrorail. The trend was spurred by Brickell City Centre, Swire Properties’ mammoth 5.4 million square-foot mixed-use complex that opened in 2016.

When Swire announced its ambitious plan in 2011, Miami was still in the grip of the Great Recession. Brickell was a ghost town of unlit condos. Metrorail and Metromover’s grungy stations reflected county funding shortages. The idea of an upscale city-within- a-city that would lure shoppers, diners, residents and office workers arriving by public transit seemed like a pipe dream.

But long before the designer shops, condos, offices and eateries opened, developer Swire Properties spent $10 million refurbishing the Eighth Street Metromover Station, with a design by Arquitectonica, that would fit functionally and aesthetically into the project’s finished structure. As part of the station’s redesign, Swire is under contract to maintain the facility until 2025, with an option to renew the agreement every 10 years after that, up to 99 years.

“All our mixed-use developments in Hong Kong and China sit on top of major transport nodes,” said Kieran Bowers, president of Swire Properties. “In Miami, there’s only the Metrorail and Metromover to choose from. But we’ll always integrate public transport into the project.”

Swire and Arquitectonica paid special heed to the station’s design and its role in the overall plan. “It would have been easy for us to have made changes but left a municipal style of architecture design. But we wanted you to feel a difference when you arrive at Brickell Centre,” Bowers said. Florida East Coast Industries (FECI) is putting the transit concept on steroids.The $3 billion, 235-mile Brightline inter-city express train service will be the first to connect South Florida in early fall via a rail system. Passengers will be able to travel from Miami to Fort Lauderdale in less that 30 minutes at a speed of up to 79 miles per hour. The train will reach up to 125 miles per hour on the eventual extension connecting West Palm Beach to Orlando.

All aboard

The project, a privately owned venture by FECI subsidiary Brightline, is expected to alleviate South Florida traffic woes, removing an estimated three million cars from clogged highways such as I-95 and U.S. 1. One key element: a vertical neighborhood created around the rail’s Miami hub.

In downtown, FECI is developing the 11-acre MiamiCentral on Northwest First Avenue between Northwest Third and Eighth streets. The station will connect to Metrorail, Metromover and the Tri-rail and feature three buildings offering 800 rental apartments, nearly 200,000 square feet of retail space, and 300,000 square feet of Class-A office space.

Tere Blanca, founder and CEO of Blanca Real Estate, which is handling commercial leasing, says MiamiCentral will offer grocery stores, food and beverage options at all price ranges, a fitness center, an elevated jogging track, and loads of shopping. Service between Fort Lauderdale and West Palm Beach is to begin in July, with Miami service launching this fall.

“The Brightline group is moving their offices there this summer,” Blanca said. “Several leases are already underway, and the office building is delivering at the end of June and should be leased out before the end of the year. It’s an exciting project that is driving tremendous investment around it.”

$74 million Amount being spent on improving city infrastructure at Miami Worldcenter in downtown Miami

One of the biggest neighboring investments: The massive Miami Worldcenter, the 27-acre mixed-use project spanning 10 city blocks adjacent to the MiamiCentral station. The second-largest in development in the U.S. after Manhattan’s Hudson Yards, Miami Worldcenter spans 10 city blocks and will offer a combination of retail, residential, hotel, office and expo spaces. The first phase of the project is due in 2019.

As part of the $2 billion Miami Worldcenter project, developers issued $74 million worth of private bonds to fund installation and improvement of sewage and water lines, drainage, cable and Internet fibers and new sidewalks in the formerly blighted area.

“People look at Miami Worldcenter as a project, but it’s really not: It’s a truly mixed-use city-within- a-city,” said Nitin Motwani, managing principal of Miami Worldcenter Associates, a joint venture between the Falcone Group and Centurion Partners. “We’re hoping this will have the kind of impact on downtown Miami that Rockefeller Center had on Manhattan: change the way that area operates. All the infrastructure work that the public will enjoy is not the sexy stuff that everyone likes to talk about. But it’s the stuff that makes possible all the buildings you see on Brickell.”

Building community

Other developers are investing in less tangible, but still crucial, amenities. Nir Shoshani, who runs NR Investments with his partner Ron Gottesmann, has been spearheading the cultural scene over the past three years in the self- branded Arts + Entertainment district near the Omni in downtown Miami.

The developers have drawn a young demographic to the formerly desolate neighborhood via pumped-up programming: free rooftop concerts featuring folk and acoustic acts from around the U.S.; outdoor movie screenings hosted by the Miami Film Festival, street markets and art shows.

Shoshani estimates he has invested more than $1.5 million on all the area’s events thus far, and his gamble may be about to pay off. The 37-story Canvas Condo tower, at 1630 NE First Ave., is scheduled to be completed in early 2018, with its bohemian-styled units ranging in size from 620-1,110 square feet and selling for $300,000-$580,000.

“Risk is always a factor in business, especially in real estate,” Shoshani said. “Our idea was to really push forward with an urban village concept. If people had thought what we’ve been doing was a promotional stunt by a developer, it would have never gotten off the ground. This wasn’t a renaissance: It’s not like there was something going on in this neighborhood 50 years ago.”

Other developments feature amenities that dig even deeper into their communities, providing job opportunities, healthcare, museums and youth centers.

A $307 million redevelopment of Liberty Square, Miami-Dade County’s biggest and oldest housing project, broke ground in May. When completed by 2020, developer Related Urban Development will deliver 1,400 condos, townhouse and apartments — all integrated with free wifi — as well as a youth center provided by the Mourning Family Foundation, a YMCA-run family center and daycare, a museum celebrating the area’s history, a medical center and 65,000 square feet of retail anchored by a national grocery chain and supplanted by locally owned businesses.

To the north, slow but steady progress continues on SoLe Mia, a 183-acre development at 15045 Biscayne Blvd. in North Miami. The project — a joint venture between Richard LeFrak and Turnberry Associates co-chairs Jeffrey Soffer and Jackie Soffer — will occupy the largest piece of underutilized land east of Biscayne Boulevard in the county. SoLe Mia will be comprised of 4,390 residences, 1.4 million square feet of retail space, dining and entertainment and two swimmable 10-acre lagoons.

According to the developer, 29 percent of the 14,000 short- and long-term jobs created by the project have been filled by North Miami residents — nearly three times the 10 percent mandated by the county.

Old-school amenities still popular

The growth of practical, neighborhood-building amenities doesn’t mean traditional standbys such as clubhouses and swimming pools are going away. Carlos Gonzalez, division president of Lennar Homes, Florida’s largest housing developer, said variations on tried-and- true amenities are still an effective way to sell new houses.

“The No. 1 competitor for all new home developers is the resale market,” he said. “There are more resale transactions than new home transactions. So how do you set yourself apart other than having new product built to the latest codes? We do home automation and energy saving. But that isn’t enough. You have to provide things such as attractive clubhouses with a kids’ water park, or a gym for grown-ups with an adjacent playroom for your kids while you work out. In South Florida, we’re tailored toward outdoor living, so we have exterior kitchens and fire pits.”

But as Miami’s population density increases and familiar neighborhoods develop more nooks and crannies, developers will continue to gamble on long-term community-building endeavors — a sign of faith in the city’s continued growth.

“When we first started this, people thought we were crazy,” Miami Worldcenter’s Motwani said. “During the recession, they thought we were stupid. Today they say we’re lucky. We are, because a lot of what we counted on has come to fruition. But this kind of transformative project just takes a little longer. It’s a great opportunity to do something long-lasting and more meaningful than just coming in, putting up another building and leaving.”

Miami Office Market Thrives Due to Young Workers Seeking South Florida Lifestyle

Looking ahead to the rest of 2017, we can expect to see continued improvement of Miami’s office market based on strong market fundamentals and employment growth. Key trends to watch in 2017 that will help drive and shape the market, include:

• Steady, modest growth in office rents

• Declining available office supply

• New transit-oriented mixed-use developments that include office space in both Miami’s downtown urban core and other connected walkable neighborhoods such as Coconut Grove, Coral Gables and Wynwood

• Tenants adopting new office design standards

• Increased moves between submarkets and new-to- market companies positively impacting net absorption

Office demand will continue to be fueled by vibrant population growth of young professionals and Miami’s appeal as a growing, global and entrepreneurial city. Miami-Dade County’s population has grown 8 percent in the past five years, making it the seventh largest county in the United States. In 2016, more than 20,000 jobs were added in the county, predominately in the construction, real estate, professional services and financial services industries. This economic growth has fueled expansion activity in the office market and should hold steady in 2017.

Miami’s focus on cultivating innovation and entrepreneurship has also positively impacted the office market. In the past two years, new co-working spaces have represented over 350,000 square feet of completed lease transactions. Miami has also welcomed a new wave of technology companies to Miami, including Uber, Flatbook and the expansions of Facebook, Google and Skyscanner, to name a few.

Last year, millennials became the nation’s largest workforce demographic and sparked the conversation about new office space trends. As millennials take leadership roles in companies that have established themselves in traditional office environments, those companies are now seeking the next modern and urban office space. Tenants now choose buildings for their connectivity to mass transit and walkability to varied residential, retail, restaurants and entertainment offerings. Unique amenities such as Wi-Fi connected common areas, tenant lounges, fitness centers, bike racks and concierge services are also key drivers.

Fundamentals are Strong

Vacancy drops and building trades will continue to drive up rents. Last year’s strong building trading activity helped contribute to the ongoing rise in rents. More than 3.9 million square feet of office traded within Miami’s four major office submarkets of Downtown, Brickell, Coral Gables and Airport West Dade. As an example, after the new ownership announced common area renovations and new amenities being offered to tenants, Miami’s Courthouse Tower located across the street from Miami-Dade’s Courthouse and a short walk to the new MiamiCentral station now under construction, achieved an increase of more than 40 percent in rents. We expect to see this type of activity continue through 2017.

Building sales generated significant buzz in 2016, with Downtown Miami and its surrounding neighborhoods attracting the most activity. Notable sales include Brickman’s purchase of Courthouse Tower and the 200 Southeast First building for $27 million and $33 million, respectively. Also making headlines, Sumitomo snagged Miami Tower for $348 per square foot, East End Capital bought New World Tower for $270 per square foot and Southeast Financial Center sold to Pontegadea for $516 million ($432.36 per square foot). The significant trading activity in the urban core is a direct result of Miami’s strong appeal as an international city, its strong real estate fundamentals, including significant barriers to entry, steady increase of rents and limited new inventory scheduled for delivery in the next 36 months.

Transit-Oriented Projects

Miami’s fast-growing population and traffic concerns are shifting renewed emphasis to mass-transit solutions. Transit-oriented development has become a new standard for office development. An example is Miami Central, which is slated for delivery in the fall of 2017, redefining regional business connectivity and setting a new bar for what tenants seek in office space. The mixed-use project will deliver 280,000 square feet of office that is already 60 percent preleased, several new food and beverage concepts including Central Fare located within the 160,000 square feet of commercial space and 800 multifamily units designed to meet the needs of young professionals. As tenant demand for access, walkability, and sustainability increases, expect to see an increase in this type of office development in neighborhoods outside of the traditional urban core.

Without doubt, the future for Miami’s office market looks bright. Miami’s international appeal and ongoing foreign and domestic investment into the local economy will continue to drive its continued success within the office market this year.

Realizarán un evento con el fin de recaudar fondos para ayudar a las madres solteras

May 17, 2017

El evento ‘Hard harts and Hight Heels’ se realizará el jueves 8 de junio en el East Hotel de Brickell City Centre. Para más información visita

www.miamihabitat.org

Miami Office Market Thrives Due to Young Workers Seeking South Florida Lifestyle

Looking ahead to the rest of 2017, we can expect to see continued improvement of Miami’s office market based on strong market fundamentals and employment growth. Key trends to watch in 2017 that will help drive and shape the market, include:

• Steady, modest growth in office rents

• Declining available office supply

• New transit-oriented mixed-use developments that include office space in both Miami’s downtown urban core and other connected walkable neighborhoods such as Coconut Grove, Coral Gables and Wynwood

• Tenants adopting new office design standards

• Increased moves between submarkets and new-to- market companies positively impacting net absorption

Office demand will continue to be fueled by vibrant population growth of young professionals and Miami’s appeal as a growing, global and entrepreneurial city. Miami-Dade County’s population has grown 8 percent in the past five years, making it the seventh largest county in the United States. In 2016, more than 20,000 jobs were added in the county, predominately in the construction, real estate, professional services and financial services industries. This economic growth has fueled expansion activity in the office market and should hold steady in 2017.

Miami’s focus on cultivating innovation and entrepreneurship has also positively impacted the office market. In the past two years, new co-working spaces have represented over 350,000 square feet of completed lease transactions. Miami has also welcomed a new wave of technology companies to Miami, including Uber, Flatbook and the expansions of Facebook, Google and Skyscanner, to name a few.

Last year, millennials became the nation’s largest workforce demographic and sparked the conversation about new office space trends. As millennials take leadership roles in companies that have established themselves in traditional office environments, those companies are now seeking the next modern and urban office space. Tenants now choose buildings for their connectivity to mass transit and walkability to varied residential, retail, restaurants and entertainment offerings. Unique amenities such as Wi-Fi connected common areas, tenant lounges, fitness centers, bike racks and concierge services are also key drivers.

Fundamentals are Strong

Vacancy drops and building trades will continue to drive up rents. Last year’s strong building trading activity helped contribute to the ongoing rise in rents. More than 3.9 million square feet of office traded within Miami’s four major office submarkets of Downtown, Brickell, Coral Gables and Airport West Dade. As an example, after the new ownership announced common area renovations and new amenities being offered to tenants, Miami’s Courthouse Tower located across the street from Miami-Dade’s Courthouse and a short walk to the new MiamiCentral station now under construction, achieved an increase of more than 40 percent in rents. We expect to see this type of activity continue through 2017.

Building sales generated significant buzz in 2016, with Downtown Miami and its surrounding neighborhoods attracting the most activity. Notable sales include Brickman’s purchase of Courthouse Tower and the 200 Southeast First building for $27 million and $33 million, respectively. Also making headlines, Sumitomo snagged Miami Tower for $348 per square foot, East End Capital bought New World Tower for $270 per square foot and Southeast Financial Center sold to Pontegadea for $516 million ($432.36 per square foot). The significant trading activity in the urban core is a direct result of Miami’s strong appeal as an international city, its strong real estate fundamentals, including significant barriers to entry, steady increase of rents and limited new inventory scheduled for delivery in the next 36 months.

Transit-Oriented Projects

Miami’s fast-growing population and traffic concerns are shifting renewed emphasis to mass-transit solutions. Transit-oriented development has become a new standard for office development. An example is Miami Central, which is slated for delivery in the fall of 2017, redefining regional business connectivity and setting a new bar for what tenants seek in office space. The mixed-use project will deliver 280,000 square feet of office that is already 60 percent preleased, several new food and beverage concepts including Central Fare located within the 160,000 square feet of commercial space and 800 multifamily units designed to meet the needs of young professionals. As tenant demand for access, walkability, and sustainability increases, expect to see an increase in this type of office development in neighborhoods outside of the traditional urban core.

Without doubt, the future for Miami’s office market looks bright. Miami’s international appeal and ongoing foreign and domestic investment into the local economy will continue to drive its continued success within the office market this year.

Wynwood Officially becomes a work-and-play neighborhood

Wynwood Officially becomes a work-and-play neighborhood

The first-ever office building to debut in Miami’s famed arts district will break groud early near year. Cube Wynwd, an Arquitectonica-designed eight-story office building owned by RedSky Capital, will feature retail space and a rooftop terrace for workers. RedSky Capital originally purchased the land for $5.85 million. (South Florida Business Journal)

 

Power Leaders in Real Estate

April 14, 2017

In many ways, South Florida’s skylines, shorelines and cityscapes have helped define our global appearance. They’re attractive, iconic and world class.

Many of the architects, developers, real estate professionals and property owners behind our marquee and emerging developments are as well-known as the projects they’ve become associated with.

But who are these executives?

With this year’s Power Leaders in Real Estate list, we decided to probe a little more to get a better glimpse into what personal history and philosophies have driven their success. We asked about their greatest career accomplishments, what motivates – or “drives” – them, what have been their greatest rewards and challenges, even what one question they would ask of one person.

What we get is a glimpse into the minds behind the properties. What we discover are the personalities who continue to make South Florida a thriving global destination.

Tere Blanca

CEO, Blanca Commercial Real Estate

www.blancacre.com

1450 Brickell Ave., Suite 2060, Miami 33131

(305) 577-8850

Birthplace: Cuba

Education: B.B.A. and M.B.A., University of Miami

Biggest reward/biggest challenge: Most rewarding is seeing clients thrive thanks to the solutions we provided, and seeing our community benefit from my firm’s volunteerism and support. Most challenging is juggling responsibilities to my work, community and family.

Personal elevator speech: I honor each day fully, waking up and going to sleep acknowledging what I am most grateful for that day and visualizing my life the day after.

Advice to your college-graduate self: Life is a journey that leads you to unexpected opportunities. Be open to all possibilities.

Looking To The Next Generation For Office Space Needs

MIAMI—Tere Blanca of Blanca Commercial Real Estate unpacks the process for professional service firms as they redesign their office spaces to align with the “workplace of the future” in this EXCLUSIVE commentary.

“Savvy firms are deploying proven methodologies to overcome the obstacles and maximize the opportunities,” writes Blanca.

MIAMI—A rapidly growing number of professional service firms are redesigning their office spaces to align with the “workplace of the future” and reap benefits including improving collaboration, client and partner service, employee recruitment and retention and technology integration. Along the way, they are recognizing that the process is far more complex than merely relocating to a trendier part of town. Savvy firms are deploying proven methodologies to overcome the obstacles and maximize the opportunities.

Professionals today are more focused on the design and location of their offices because they see the impacts on productivity, collaboration, cross selling and cohesion, as well as the ability to attract high-quality employees, particularly millennials. The office space also is an important part of the overall brand experience, as internal and external stakeholders are influenced by the look, feel, and utility of the space.

The latest studies on workplace design confirm that professional services firms are adopting innovative floor plans that incorporate plenty of natural light, open spaces that promote collaboration and innovative workspace configurations to accommodate diverse work processes and projects. They also are incorporating high-tech amenities such as high-tech conference facilities with media walls to connect employees with clients and partners across all points of the globe.

Many firms that have undertaken such redesigns have encountered challenges including internal issues building consensus, understanding their own needs and identifying the right design to support their unique business objectives. The conflicts are often more significant for larger companies in which multiple generations are represented within their leadership, resulting in differing visions for the companies and the office styles that best align to their missions.

These conflicts stem from the fact that until recently, professional service companies have embraced more traditional décor and have kept executives working behind closed doors of individual offices. However, if these companies want to compete for today’s new generation of professionals, they must adapt to their demands: more modern-looking environments with open, collaborative office layouts and the flexibility to work remotely.

Without a doubt, the professional service firms that have successfully transitioned to more modern office designs have taken their office moves more seriously than in years past. Rather than merely hiring commercial real estate advisors based on personal relationships, they are hiring them based on criteria including professional service industry experience, local market insight and a proven methodology to guide them through the process. They are working closely with these advisors to conduct thorough analyses, build internal consensus and guide progress through each stage of the process to ensure they find the dynamic office environments that support their unique needs.

In our experience working with professional-services firms, we have found it helpful to focus on a base set of criteria from the outset, including:

1. Your company’s brand identity and strategic business goals. This should be a key driver as you evaluate your options, either at your existing space or at another location. By kick-starting an internal dialogue on who you are as a company and who you want to become, you can begin to consider some key questions: What type of talent do you want to attract and retain? Are you interested in attracting a younger generation of millennials who are motivated by collaboration and flexibility? What types of clients and partners are you targeting? Do you wish to be known as a traditional, conservative company or as an innovative, forward-thinking company?

2. Your financial goals. It is critical to consider your budget, the amount you are currently spending on your space and the amount you would ideally be comfortable spending. It is important to keep in mind that an experienced commercial real estate broker can help you find the optimal space to meet your needs while significantly reducing your occupancy costs. Do not assume that bigger offices will necessarily cost more. On the contrary, by implementing an efficient workplace design, a professional service company can often reduce its footprint and maintain ample room for growth while increasing productivity. Ultimately, the key is to get the space right by working with experts who can help you find creative ways to affordably obtain your perfect office.

3.  Your company culture. It is important to consider how you want your team, clients and partners to experience your office. How do you want people to feel when they arrive and leave your office? What is the first impression you want your office to convey? Do you want a high-end corporate reception area that “wows” and impresses visitors upfront, or do you want a warm, welcoming area that makes visitors feel comfortable and at home? Do you want your team members to enter your office through a brightly lit open area that facilitates interaction? How would elements like more natural light and communal areas impact your office dynamics? Within your office, do you want to foster more cross-selling between divisions and provide access to the latest technologies? Would your clients, partners and other stakeholders appreciate access to state-of- the-art conference rooms where they can conduct virtual meetings with clients and partners around the world?

4.  The decision makers. The key to achieving the optimum outcome for your office space is to gain consensus early in the process and to identify an appropriate group of decision makers who will be responsible for identifying the right space for the firm. Smaller groups tend to be nimbler and more effective than boards, which often leads to too many cooks in the kitchen and navigating numerous conflicting viewpoints. In some cases, it may also make sense to work with a designated office selection committee to develop a narrow list of potential properties to present to the company’s management for consideration.

5. The advisors. Finding the right office space can be a daunting task to undertake on your own, so it is crucial to identify the right advisors. Your advisor should conduct a comprehensive assessment, complete with thorough financial analyses and forecasts to demonstrate that it fully understands your current situation, and identify viable solutions that align with your future business goals. The firm should help guide your key decision makers through a brainstorming session that will help define your company’s immediate needs as well as looking ahead five, 10 and 20 years. This analysis will ultimately help you define and establish the priorities for your office space. When you have completed these steps, it is important to address the office search in phases:

Phase One: Begin by having your leadership team establish and reach consensus on vision, space criteria, timeline, and a recommended strategy. In the first phase, you must ensure that your company gets these parameters right. Toward that end, it may be advisable to issue a request for proposals to identify an appropriate architectural firm to conduct an occupancy analysis and confirm your optimal space programmatic needs. This will help you identify which industry best practices to incorporate as you identify the best ways to design and utilize your new office space. At this stage, it is also critical to have honest internal discussions with key executives to confirm the ideal design and utilization plan for the offices.

Phase Two: Develop a scorecard that establishes a basis that informs your decision-making process and helps you make the best selections. This scorecard should consider an array of key factors including geographic location, parking, on-site amenities, tenant services, walkability, and access to public transit.

At this stage, you should begin to engage the market with your established office requirements. Developing a short list of contenders and touring your top choices will give you greater leverage for your future tenancy as the current landlords and owners of prospective new locations begin recognizing your name and your interest. It also will ensure that your firm is well-positioned to secure the most favorable outcomes and seize immediate opportunities as they present themselves.

Phase 3: When the team has reached consensus on the top two or three options, your commercial real estate advisor should negotiate terms based on the criteria and benchmarks established in phases one and two. Then, your advisor should help you complete a lease or renewal amendment, and remain engaged with you throughout the process, from preliminary renovations to ultimately moving into the new space. Indeed, transitioning to “the workplace of the future” is an exciting moment that can be positively transformative for professional service companies. To ensure your business capitalizes on this important shift, it is critical to follow proven best practices and methodologies to ensure the best-possible results. Professional service firms that do this can gain a significant competitive advantage and better position themselves for continued success.

Looking To The Next Generation For Office Space Needs

MIAMI—Tere Blanca of Blanca Commercial Real Estate unpacks the process for professional service firms as they redesign their office spaces to align with the “workplace of the future” in this EXCLUSIVE commentary.

April 10, 2017

“Savvy firms are deploying proven methodologies to overcome the obstacles and maximize the opportunities,” writes Blanca.

MIAMI—A rapidly growing number of professional service firms are redesigning their office spaces to align with the “workplace of the future” and reap benefits including improving collaboration, client and partner service, employee recruitment and retention and technology integration. Along the way, they are recognizing that the process is far more complex than merely relocating to a trendier part of town. Savvy firms are deploying proven methodologies to overcome the obstacles and maximize the opportunities.

Professionals today are more focused on the design and location of their offices because they see the impacts on productivity, collaboration, cross selling and cohesion, as well as the ability to attract high-quality employees, particularly millennials. The office space also is an important part of the overall brand experience, as internal and external stakeholders are influenced by the look, feel, and utility of the space.

The latest studies on workplace design confirm that professional services firms are adopting innovative floor plans that incorporate plenty of natural light, open spaces that promote collaboration and innovative workspace configurations to accommodate diverse work processes and projects. They also are incorporating high-tech amenities such as high-tech conference facilities with media walls to connect employees with clients and partners across all points of the globe.

Many firms that have undertaken such redesigns have encountered challenges including internal issues building consensus, understanding their own needs and identifying the right design to support their unique business objectives. The conflicts are often more significant for larger companies in which multiple generations are represented within their leadership, resulting in differing visions for the companies and the office styles that best align to their missions.

These conflicts stem from the fact that until recently, professional service companies have embraced more traditional décor and have kept executives working behind closed doors of individual offices. However, if these companies want to compete for today’s new generation of professionals, they must adapt to their demands: more modern-looking environments with open, collaborative office layouts and the flexibility to work remotely.

Without a doubt, the professional service firms that have successfully transitioned to more modern office designs have taken their office moves more seriously than in years past. Rather than merely hiring commercial real estate advisors based on personal relationships, they are hiring them based on criteria including professional service industry experience, local market insight and a proven methodology to guide them through the process. They are working closely with these advisors to conduct thorough analyses, build internal consensus and guide progress through each stage of the process to ensure they find the dynamic office environments that support their unique needs.

In our experience working with professional-services firms, we have found it helpful to focus on a base set of criteria from the outset, including:

1. Your company’s brand identity and strategic business goals. This should be a key driver as you evaluate your options, either at your existing space or at another location. By kick-starting an internal dialogue on who you are as a company and who you want to become, you can begin to consider some key questions: What type of talent do you want to attract and retain? Are you interested in attracting a younger generation of millennials who are motivated by collaboration and flexibility? What types of clients and partners are you targeting? Do you wish to be known as a traditional, conservative company or as an innovative, forward-thinking company?

2. Your financial goals. It is critical to consider your budget, the amount you are currently spending on your space and the amount you would ideally be comfortable spending. It is important to keep in mind that an experienced commercial real estate broker can help you find the optimal space to meet your needs while significantly reducing your occupancy costs. Do not assume that bigger offices will necessarily cost more. On the contrary, by implementing an efficient workplace design, a professional service company can often reduce its footprint and maintain ample room for growth while increasing productivity. Ultimately, the key is to get the space right by working with experts who can help you find creative ways to affordably obtain your perfect office.

3.  Your company culture. It is important to consider how you want your team, clients and partners to experience your office. How do you want people to feel when they arrive and leave your office? What is the first impression you want your office to convey? Do you want a high-end corporate reception area that “wows” and impresses visitors upfront, or do you want a warm, welcoming area that makes visitors feel comfortable and at home? Do you want your team members to enter your office through a brightly lit open area that facilitates interaction? How would elements like more natural light and communal areas impact your office dynamics? Within your office, do you want to foster more cross-selling between divisions and provide access to the latest technologies? Would your clients, partners and other stakeholders appreciate access to state-of- the-art conference rooms where they can conduct virtual meetings with clients and partners around the world?

4.  The decision makers. The key to achieving the optimum outcome for your office space is to gain consensus early in the process and to identify an appropriate group of decision makers who will be responsible for identifying the right space for the firm. Smaller groups tend to be nimbler and more effective than boards, which often leads to too many cooks in the kitchen and navigating numerous conflicting viewpoints. In some cases, it may also make sense to work with a designated office selection committee to develop a narrow list of potential properties to present to the company’s management for consideration.

5. The advisors. Finding the right office space can be a daunting task to undertake on your own, so it is crucial to identify the right advisors. Your advisor should conduct a comprehensive assessment, complete with thorough financial analyses and forecasts to demonstrate that it fully understands your current situation, and identify viable solutions that align with your future business goals. The firm should help guide your key decision makers through a brainstorming session that will help define your company’s immediate needs as well as looking ahead five, 10 and 20 years. This analysis will ultimately help you define and establish the priorities for your office space. When you have completed these steps, it is important to address the office search in phases:

Phase One: Begin by having your leadership team establish and reach consensus on vision, space criteria, timeline, and a recommended strategy. In the first phase, you must ensure that your company gets these parameters right. Toward that end, it may be advisable to issue a request for proposals to identify an appropriate architectural firm to conduct an occupancy analysis and confirm your optimal space programmatic needs. This will help you identify which industry best practices to incorporate as you identify the best ways to design and utilize your new office space. At this stage, it is also critical to have honest internal discussions with key executives to confirm the ideal design and utilization plan for the offices.

Phase Two: Develop a scorecard that establishes a basis that informs your decision-making process and helps you make the best selections. This scorecard should consider an array of key factors including geographic location, parking, on-site amenities, tenant services, walkability, and access to public transit.

At this stage, you should begin to engage the market with your established office requirements. Developing a short list of contenders and touring your top choices will give you greater leverage for your future tenancy as the current landlords and owners of prospective new locations begin recognizing your name and your interest. It also will ensure that your firm is well-positioned to secure the most favorable outcomes and seize immediate opportunities as they present themselves.

Phase 3: When the team has reached consensus on the top two or three options, your commercial real estate advisor should negotiate terms based on the criteria and benchmarks established in phases one and two. Then, your advisor should help you complete a lease or renewal amendment, and remain engaged with you throughout the process, from preliminary renovations to ultimately moving into the new space. Indeed, transitioning to “the workplace of the future” is an exciting moment that can be positively transformative for professional service companies. To ensure your business capitalizes on this important shift, it is critical to follow proven best practices and methodologies to ensure the best-possible results. Professional service firms that do this can gain a significant competitive advantage and better position themselves for continued success.

Tere Blanca Shines Light On New Trend Among Office Tenants

April 4, 2017

GlobeSt.com caught up with Chris Dekker, vice president of Mayfair Real Estate Advisors, the project’s developer, and Tere Blanca, president and CEO of Blanca Commercial Real Estate, to get their take the types of tenants that flock to Coconut Grove. You can still read part one: Coconut Grove sees a 30-year first in commercial real estate development.

GlobeSt.com: What kind of tenants are most interested in taking Coconut Grove office space?

Dekker: Coconut Grove has emerged as a hotbed for entrepreneurial companies and global brands, including professional services firms, media companies, design firms, international finance, investment shops, and more. The offices at Mayfair in the Grove are a good example, which is home to major organizations like Publicis/Sapient, Crispin Porter, Regus, and GE as well as an assortment of local firms that make for a vibrant tenant mix.

The common denominator across companies at Mayfair in the Grove—and those that will relocate to Terra’s new class A development at Mary Street—is that they see value in locating in an urban, walkable neighborhood that still preserves the spirit of Coconut Grove. Mary Street will also appeal to busines decision-makers coming from points south who are seeking a shorter commute by comparison with traveling to Brickell and Downtown as well as those seeking office space benefiting from a modern architectural design.

 

GlobeSt.com: Are there specific amenities that are appealing to tenants touring new buildings in today’s market?

Blanca: The same way consumers are gravitating toward authentic, urban neighborhoods, we’re seeing office users trend toward walkable neighborhoods that offer a strong sense of community and rich amenity base. In many ways, Coconut Grove is an amenity itself and has already successfully attracted major brands including Sony Music, Sapient Nitro and Virgin Hotels.

 

Beyond that, tenants today value office space that enhances the lifestyle experience. At One CocoWalk, the office building is being designed with these needs in mind.

We’ll have favorable parking ratios, a rooftop terrace, a private entrance and lobby for office guests, office spaces with abundant natural light and waterfront views, and an on-site fitness center inside CocoWalk. The ownership is also planning to design and build One CocoWalk to achieve Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design certification.

Finding the right office space for your firm

Accounting firms today are increasingly striving to redefine their office spaces in an effort to reap the benefits of the “workplace of the future.” These benefits include attracting and retaining quality talent, fostering a more collaborative work environment, providing better client and partner service, and accessing the latest technologies. However, accounting firms are recognizing that the process is more complex than they had imagined. Following is some insight and methodology that has proven to help accounting firms of all sizes navigate the complexities of aligning their office spaces with their business goals.

Without a doubt, the right office space can significantly improve productivity,collaboration, cross-selling and cohesion, and enhance an accounting firm’s ability to attract and retain quality talent, particularly Millennials. The office space also is an important part of the firm’s brand experience. Internal and external stakeholders will be influenced by the look, feel and utility of the space.

Our experience working with accounting firms and the latest studies on workplace design confirm that the profession is adopting innovative space plans incorporating lots of natural light and open space, office layouts that foster collaboration, and innovative workspace configurations to accommodate diverse work processes and projects. In addition, accounting firms are incorporating high-tech amenities in individual workspaces, such a media walls in professionals’ offices, as well as in common areas, such as high- tech conference facilities to connect employees with clients and partners across the globe.

At the same time, firms are encountering key challenges adopting the workplace of the future, including: internal issues building consensus, understanding their own needs, and identifying the right design to support their business objectives. The conflicts can be more significant for larger accounting firms with multiple generations represented within their leadership and often conflicting visions for the office styles that best align to their missions.

To a large extent, these conflicts stem from the fact that accounting firms historically have embraced more traditional décor and have kept executives working behind the closed doors of large offices. Meanwhile, today’s new generation of accounting professionals is interested in more modern-looking environments with open, collaborative office layouts and the flexibility to work remotely.

The accounting firms that are successfully navigating these internal conflicts and securing appropriately designed office spaces are enjoying significant benefits. How are they achieving this? Among other things, they are taking their office moves more seriously. Rather than merely hiring commercial real estate advisors based on personal relationships, they are hiring them based on criteria including accounting industry experience, local market insight, and a proven methodology to guide them through the process. They are working closely with these advisors to conduct thorough qualitative and quantitative analyses, build internal consensus and follow a proven methodology to create dynamic office environments that support their unique needs.

We have found it helpful for accounting firms to focus on a base set of criteria from the outset, including:

1. Brand identity and strategic business goals. This should be a key driver as firms evaluate their options. The exercise will facilitate internal dialogue on who they are and who they wish to become. Some key questions to consider: What type of talent does the firm want to attract and retain? Is the firm interested in attracting a younger generation of Millennials who are motivated by collaboration and flexibility? Does the firm wish to be known as traditional and conservative or as innovative and forward-thinking? What types of clients and partners are being targeted?

2. Financial goals. It is critical to consider budget – specifically, the current amount being spent on the space — and compare it with the desired amount. Do not assume that bigger offices will necessarily cost more. On the contrary, by implementing an efficient workplace design, firms can often reduce their footprint and maintain ample room for growth while increasing productivity. Ultimately, the key is to get the space right by working with experts who can identify find creative, customized solutions.

3. Company culture. How does the firm want its team members, clients and partners to experience the office? How does it want people to feel when they arrive and depart? What is the first impression it wants clients and partners to experience when they arrive? Does it want a high-end corporate reception area that “wows” and impresses visitors upfront, or does it prefer a warm, welcoming area that makes visitors feel comfortable and at home? How would elements like more natural light and communal areas impact office dynamics? Within the office, does the firm want to foster more cross-selling between divisions and provide access to the latest technologies? Would clients, partners and other stakeholders appreciate access to state-of- the-art conference rooms where they can conduct virtual meetings with people anywhere in the world?

Increasingly, we are seeing accounting firms focused on establishing cultures that promote collaboration, as well as adopting shared workspace concepts where executives and staff members can come together, have meaningful conversations, and create the deep collaboration that occurs in spaces that truly enable people to connect face-to- face. This higher level of collaboration and communication is proving to enable accounting professionals to better serve their clients and boost employee satisfaction. It also serves as an effective tool for recruiting and retaining the right talent, especially Millennials.

4. The decision-makers. The key to achieving the optimum office space is to gain consensus early in the process and to identify an appropriate group of decision makers who will be responsible for identifying the right space for the firm. In our experience, we have found smaller groups to be nimbler and more effective than boards with too many team members with conflicting viewpoints. In some cases, it may also make sense to work with a designated office selection committee to develop a narrow list of potential office properties to present to the company’s management to consider.

5. The advisors. The complex process of finding the right office space can be a daunting task for accounting firms to undertake on their own, so it is crucial to identify the right advisors to provide guidance and representation. It is wise to identify commercial real estate advisors who have successfully advised accounting firms and have a track record for securing the optimal real estate solutions for these clients. When selected, the advisors should conduct comprehensive assessments, including thorough financial analyses and forecasting, to fully understand the current situation and identify viable solutions that align with future business goals. They should help guide key decision-makers through brainstorming sessions that will help define the firm’s immediate needs as well as looking ahead five, 10 and 20 years. This analysis will ultimately help the firm define and establish the office space priorities.

When these steps have been completed, it is important to address the office search in phases:

Phase One: The firm’s leadership team should establish and reach consensus on vision, space criteria, timeline, and a recommended strategy. In the first phase of the process, it will be critical to ensure that the firm gets the space right. Toward that end, it may be advisable to issue a request for proposals to identify an appropriate architectural firm to conduct an occupancy analysis and confirm the optimal space programmatic needs. This will help identify which industry best practices to incorporate and the best ways to design and utilize the space. At this stage, it is critical to have meaningful internal discussions with key executive team members to confirm the ideal design and utilization plan for the offices.

Phase Two: The firm should develop a scorecard that establishes a basis for informing decision-making process and making the best selections. This scorecard should consider an array of key factors including geographic location, parking, on-site amenities, tenant services, walkability, and access to public transit.

At this stage, it is important for the firm to engage the market with its established office requirements. Touring its top options and developing a short list of candidates will give the firm greater leverage for its future tenancy. This also will drive a productive dialogue with the current landlords and owners of prospective new locations. It also will ensure the firm is well- positioned to secure the most favorable outcomes and seize immediate opportunities as they present themselves.

Phase 3: When the team has reached consensus on the top two or three options, the firm’s advisors should negotiate terms based on the criteria and benchmarks established in phases one and two. Then, the advisors should help the firm complete a lease or renewal amendment and remain engaged with the firm through the entire process, from the renovations to the occupancy of the space. Indeed, transitioning to “the workplace of the future” is an exciting moment that can be positively transformative for accounting firms. To ensure a firm can capitalize on this important shift, it is important follow proven best practices and methodologies to ensure the best-possible results. Accounting firms that do this can gain a significant competitive advantage and better position themselves for continued success.

Tere Blanca

Tere Blanca is CEO and founder of Blanca Commercial Real Estate, a leading independently owned commercial real estate brokerage firm in South Florida.